Last edited by Melkis
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

3 edition of Report of a meeting on research needs in the field of Chagas" Disease Vector Control found in the catalog.

Report of a meeting on research needs in the field of Chagas" Disease Vector Control

Report of a meeting on research needs in the field of Chagas" Disease Vector Control

Panama City, Panama, 28 September - 2 October 1987.

  • 351 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by World Health Organization in [Geneva] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Chagas" disease,
  • Animals as carriers of disease

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsSpecial Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination12 p.;
    Number of Pages12
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17632659M
    OCLC/WorldCa19000844

    Objectives: This paper presents the results of the design and implementation process for the policy of compulsory notification of chronic Chagas disease in the Brazilian state of Goiás (Resolution No. /GAB/SES-GO). Methods: The narrative was based on information provided by key actors that were part of the different stages of the process, built on contextual axes based on participants. Chagas disease vector control. Prevention of vector-borne transmission of T. cruzi has almost exclusively relied upon the application of insecticides since gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) was proven effective against triatomine bugs in the late s (Dias & Pellegrino , Romaña & Abalos ).Directed efforts toward large-scale housing housing improvement as a means of preventing or.

    Background. Chagas disease (caused by Trypanosoma cruzi) is the most important neglected tropical disease (NTD) in Latin America, infecting an estimated million people in the 21 countries where it is endemic. It is one of the NTDs targeted for control and elimination by the London Declaration goals, with the first goal being to interrupt intra-domiciliary vector-borne T. cruzi.   The resources, and the field personnel involved in Chagas disease vector control, were diverted for attempts to control A. aegypti. Here we see the problem that gave rise to the Southern Cone Initiative against Chagas disease – how to maintain political priority in the face of changing demands in public health.

    Epidemiología y control de las enfermedades transmitidas por vectores . Pratt, H.D (Washington, D.C, Organización Panamericana de la Salud, ) (Washington, D.C, .   Chagas disease (CD), one of the world’s most neglected health conditions, is a leading cause of heart disease in the Americas, creating a greater burden in disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) than any other parasitic infection, including malaria and Zika [].Caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, CD affects over six million people across the globe, over 90% of whom are in .


Share this book
You might also like
Organizational weaknesses of the Greek Manufacturing industry

Organizational weaknesses of the Greek Manufacturing industry

evaluation of an intervention strategy to prevent underachievement at A-level in a comprehensive school

evaluation of an intervention strategy to prevent underachievement at A-level in a comprehensive school

Eradication of Cattle Grubs

Eradication of Cattle Grubs

Buckling and postbuckling behavior of compression-loaded isotropic plates with cutouts

Buckling and postbuckling behavior of compression-loaded isotropic plates with cutouts

Harold

Harold

Experience versus theory in teacher education.

Experience versus theory in teacher education.

Elusive Flame, The

Elusive Flame, The

Edward Larrabee Barnes

Edward Larrabee Barnes

Peter Abelard (East Anglian Archaeology)

Peter Abelard (East Anglian Archaeology)

Steel designers manual

Steel designers manual

Introduction to Derivates

Introduction to Derivates

Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation between the United States of America and the United Mexican States, concluded on the 5th of April 1831.

Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation between the United States of America and the United Mexican States, concluded on the 5th of April 1831.

West-central Colorado

West-central Colorado

Primary and secondary phases of causality

Primary and secondary phases of causality

Stone heart

Stone heart

Estimates of the population of Virginia counties and metropolitan areas

Estimates of the population of Virginia counties and metropolitan areas

Report of a meeting on research needs in the field of Chagas" Disease Vector Control Download PDF EPUB FB2

Meeting on Research Needs in the Field of Chagas' Disease Vector Control. World Health Organization; 28 Sept Oct. Chagas disease is a vector-borne parasitic disease endemic in the Americas, where it is of major public health importance, affecting up to 8–9 million people.

Recent estimates also illustrate the very high disease burden it causes. Chagas disease is present in Mexico, but its importance is poorly documented and by: Chagas disease is a vector-borne parasitic disease of major public health importance.

Current prevention efforts are based on triatomine vector control to reduce transmission to humans. Improved access to health care and quality of services require integrated efforts and innovations, including community empowerment and participation in transformation processes.

Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease that is generally controlled by insecticide spraying. To achieve community empowerment in a health program, actions for social innovations may include: community Author: Diana Castro-Arroyave, Maria Carlota Monroy, Maria Isabel Irurita.

the 2nd Annual Meeting on Basic Research on. Centr o de Estudos e Profilaxia da field research in Chagas disease. Moléstia de Chagas, carry out a nation-wide vector control : Carlos Morel. Chagas disease”, edited by Brener and Andrade ().

In Brazil, annual meetings were organised in Ca-xambu, beginning inand annual meetings were held in Araxá, from onwards (subsequently transferred to Uberaba). These conferences reviewed the basic and applied research on Chagas disease and the results of.

Introduction. Chagas disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the Americas, with an estimated 9–10 million people currently infected, causing an annual burden of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and an annual health care cost of US$ million.

1, 2 In Mexico, the Ministry of Health reports a few hundred cases every year, 3 but estimates suggest that there may. On 9 Juneat their 15th annual meeting, the Intergovernment Commission of the Southern Cone Initiative against Chagas disease formally declared Brazil to be free of Chagas disease transmission due to Triatoma infestans.

This represents a remarkable achievement considering that this species had been the primary domestic vector infesting rural houses in > municipalities of the 12. Chagas disease (also known as American trypanosomiasis) is a tropical parasitic disease caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi.

| Explore the latest full-text research PDFs. sification of vector research in order to meet the needs of expanding and emerging disease situations. TDR-mandated activities on African trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, dengue fever, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis, malaria and onchocerciasis were critically.

A, The trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi in a peripheral blood smear from a patient with acute Chagas disease. Arrowhead indicates the kinetoplast (Giemsa stain, original magnification ×). B, Nest of T cruzi amastigotes within a cardiac myocyte in a patient with chronic Chagas disease.

Arrowhead indicates the kinetoplast (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×). Chagas disease is an anthropozoonosis from the American continent that has spread from its original boundaries through migration.

It is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, which was identified in the first decade of the 20th century. Once acute infection resolves, patients can develop chronic disease, which in up to 30–40% of cases is characterised by cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias.

nonetheless reverse this trend, and vector control is a key component of such strategies, aiming to reduce or interrupt transmission. The need for new and improved vector control tools is particularly acute in the case of malaria, dengue, HAT and Chagas disease.

Research can thus play an important role in design, development and. Summary. The goal of the meeting was to provide technical guidance for the improvement and diversification of vector research in order to meet the needs expanding and emerging disease situations.

TDR-mandated activities on African trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, dengue fever, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis, malaria and onchocerciasis were critically reviewed and accomplishments were. A recent study by Cartelle Gestal et al. reported an analysis of data from the Ministry of Public Health on the epidemiological situation of neglected tropical diseases in Ecuador [].Based on a misleading definition of Chagas disease cases not corresponding to that of the Ministry of Public Health [], the authors concluded that the government had mounted successful control campaigns, and as a.

Chagas disease is a chronic, systemic, parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and was discovered in The disease affects about 8 million people in Latin America, of whom 30–40% either have or will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive megasyndromes, or both.

In the past three decades, the control and management of Chagas disease has undergone several improvements. Why vector control. Diseases transmitted by vectors account for around 17% of the estimated global burden of communicable diseases. Mosquitoes transmit malaria, dengue, chikungunya, lymphatic filariasis, yellow fever and Zika among other diseases; flies transmit leishmaniasis, onchocerciasis and sleeping sickness; and bugs or ticks transmit Chagas disease, borreliosis (Lyme disease), typhus.

to the complexit y of Chagas disease as a zoonos is is the variety of vector s involved, being not simp ly represented by a range of rela ted species or gene ra, as is the case for all other.

The objective of this study is to report the costs of Chagas disease in Colombia, in terms of vector disease control programmes and the costs of providing care to chronic Chagas disease patients.

It has also become more evident that Chagas disease, as well as other neglected diseases, is a “poverty-disease” and that basic improvements in the housing conditions and economical development of the endemic areas would have a huge impact on its control.

Considering this, we might wonder: do we really need a vaccine against Chagas disease?. Chagas disease is a chronic, systemic, parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and was discovered in The disease affects about 8 million people in Latin America, of whom 30–40% either have or will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive megasyndromes, or .Research.

A greater emphasis on applied research and the application of basic research in disease endemic settings would be an important step in closing the gap between field and laboratory research (Table S4, D).Although efforts have been made to integrate work from laboratory to field and from field to laboratory, more progress is possible and needed (Table S1, A).Between andtwo core methods of vector control—insecticide-treated bednets and indoor residual spraying of insecticides—prevented an estimated million cases of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa (1).Major reductions in onchocerciasis, visceral leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease have also been achieved through large-scale vector control (2).